finished lady dress shirt Autumn with cufflinks

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finished: two trial canvas dresses with continuous hem

handsewn canvas dress cabin pippi longstocking langkous pockets sewing

You remember I was pondering how to convert my dress shirt pattern pieces to a dress pattern that has one continuous hem so I could use fabric that has cars riding along the hem:
naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

I finished it at home.

I added a facing to the neckline and arm holes. Tape pattern pieces together (mind the SA), trace and cut:
canvas proefjurk beleg vierkante halscanvas proefjurk beleg vierkante hals

Square neckline: reduce stitch length in the corners and back stitch a bit:
afwerking vierkante hals beleg canvas jurk vooral persen

Cut to the corner. Press. Clip where necessary. Understitch.
afwerking vierkante hals beleg canvas jurk vooral persen
afwerking vierkante hals beleg canvas jurk vooral persen
Wonderful!

Somehow the pocket ended up too wide compared to the sideseam pattern pieces. We fixed it by making a design feature out of it. I love these pockets! The fold adds shape to the skirt.

My teacher took care to let all the vertical sewing lines end at the same place but I was not so careful with sewing so they are a bit off here and there.

She taught me how to put in a hand picked zipper. The SA at CB is 1,5 cm. Place zipper at 3 mm from the edge (because a zipper is 1,2 cm wide).

The hem was done with the hem stitch, on the machine.

I finished it and wore it again and again and forgot to take a picture. But here’s a picture of its sibling that I sewed the following week a.k.a. last Thursday:
handsewn dress sewing self drafted pattern bunka dressform continuous hem
This is my Butterfly Dress. It’s the same fabric as the car fabric: a canvas with a design called “Admiral” in colourway “Spring” by Prestigious Textiles Designs from the UK. It’s a 100% cotton, 214 g/m², and it’s advertised for cushions and curtains and bed coverings. This is ideal “Pippi Longstocking fabric”: add some pockets and you’ve got a dress you can USE. Wash a fleece. Chase a pet. Ride a horse. The dress won’t tear and if it gets dirty you just wash it and it’s ready for fun again.

For the Butterfly Dress we remade the pattern. Because after I finished the taupe coloured canvas dress I had pulled apart all the different pattern pieces we so meticulously had taped together. Don’t ask me why. I sometimes do weird things. I thought I needed the pattern pieces for another dress. Or that the tape would damage the paper. Or something.
vlinderjurk handsewn dress fitted continuous hem selfdrafted pattern butterfly fabric

So the next lesson, last Wednesday, we spend two hours putting the pieces back together again but this time we put them on a new piece of pattern paper and drafted a whole new pattern. This pattern I took home and the next day I sewed the Butterfly Dress from it, in one day, and I wore it to my party on Saturday. With facing and handpicked zipper. and reinforced pocket entries. Only the hem, I didn’t have time to hem the dress. It’s just a zigzag.

The only seam in the hem:
vlinderjurk handsewn dress fitted continuous hem selfdrafted pattern butterfly fabricvlinderjurk handsewn dress fitted continuous hem selfdrafted pattern butterfly fabric

There was a slight hickup on Thursday as I forgot that the darts were based on the pattern pieces and thusly had their SA = 1 cm still incorporated. With original 10 pattern pieces that’s a wearing ease of 20 cm
vlinderjurk handsewn dress fitted continuous hem selfdrafted pattern butterfly fabric

Luckily with darts extra width can easily be remedied: handsewn dress sewing self drafted pattern bunka dressform continuous hem
Such a away back…

I drafted the facing from the pattern pieces myself by tracing and taping the pattern pieces:
vlinderjurk handsewn dress fitted continuous hem selfdrafted pattern butterfly fabric
It did not fit neatly on the fabric. Who knows what I’d done to it. Maybe I stabilized the neck line too late and had ruined it when fitting the dress?
I did stabilize it, with non bias tape:
vlinderjurk handsewn dress fitted continuous hem selfdrafted pattern butterfly fabric

Not sure if that’s the correct way. Here’s how the pattern fitted on the fabric. It will be a puzzle for the car fabric because you want the cars to be continuous and there’s one pattern piece that’s apart from the others. We’ll see: vlinderjurk handsewn dress fitted continuous hem selfdrafted pattern butterfly fabric

Pink trees dress shirt (French cuffs)

cufflink-green

Range of arm motion with this Bunka armhole and sleeve:
arm movement freedom drafted armhole sleeve Bunka dress form sewingarm movement freedom drafted armhole sleeve Bunka dress form sewing

A sleeve placket is called a “mouwsplit” in Dutch. Sew right side to wrong side, with “the house” to the shorter side/back side of the sleeve.
naaiproject sewing shirt rozeboompjes roze boompjes stof
here are some tutorials I could watch:

  • I wanted to sew this dress shirt like this:
    naaiproject sewing shirt rozeboompjes roze boompjes stof
    but then the sleeve seam needs to be right at the side seam. Mine is rotated, because it’s a Bunka sleeve and Bunka arm hole. Pity, now I cannot finish the shoulderseam the way I wanted to.
    Too much fabric on one side, not enough on the other:
    naaiproject sewing shirt rozeboompjes roze boompjes stofnaaiproject sewing shirt rozeboompjes roze boompjes stof

    A separate problem: I didn’t walk the pattern… The front panels are less wide than the back panels. The princess seams should meet each other precisely so that’s where I match them —> I should scoop out the back neck a bit and make it meet the front panel:
    naaiproject sewing shirt rozeboompjes roze boompjes stof

    The collar has the upper side reinforces (Vlieseline G700, meaning woven and more firm than 701) and the under collar a bit stretched, just like mr. Page Coffin suggests. Only 4 mm does the trick. Also done on the short sides.
    naaiproject sewing shirt rozeboompjes roze boompjes stof

    French cuffs:
    The part that doesn’t touch the wrists has interfacing on it. Vlieseline G700 which is a woven multi-purpose interfacing for ironing on. It’s more sturdy than what’s normally used for light cotton garments.
    I paid attention to the direction of the trees, when the cuffs are folded and worn.

    I attached on the WS of the sleeve, then flipped them over and pressed the SA firmly and neatly on the RS. Its edge just covered the sewing line.
    Then I tacked it down temporarily by a line of the broadest stitches my machine can do:
    roze boompjesbloes French cuffs sewing Now it will stay put while I topstitch neatly around the cuff: roze boompjesbloes French cuffs sewing
    roze boompjesbloes French cuffs sewing

    I hope the holes will disappear when the garment is washed for the first time. Inside: the topstitched line is just above the construction line. This is always a problem for me, I feel there is something to achieved here but I cannot wrap my head around it. roze boompjesbloes French cuffs sewing

    This is the top part of the French cuff, the part that folds over when they are being worn. I put the “turn of cloth” on this side so when worn it will not be visible:
    roze boompjesbloes French cuffs sewing

    Collar stand.
    Figuring out the right size this one is about 6 cm too long. The shape of the ends is also very different from the usual shape. My tiny neck gets a fitted collar stand and a collar that starts right at CF. No round shape needed. I wonder how it will look once finished. How it will wear.

    roze boompjesbloes collarstand well fitted dress shirt for a woman

    Finished.
    tailored ladies dress shirt sewing french cuffs pink trees fabric finishedtailored ladies dress shirt sewing french cuffs pink trees fabric finished
    I’ll be making these changes to the pattern:

    • spread the collar.
    • shorten the sleeve split, it’s up to my elbow now

    It fits very close at my bust and collar bones and shoulder seam. I cannot see if this is from the raised front neck line or perhaps the way I cut and sew this particular shirt. Will have to sew another one.

    Will walk the pattern before I do so.

Preparing for an advent quilt with 24 pockets

I bought a darling panel of fabric with Advent blocks from illustrator Flora Wyacott at the quilting store in Den Bosch, Bossche Quilts & Meer. Sorry for the wrinkly fabric, I had taken it out of the protection and admired it a lot before I took these pictures:
advent panel fabric Flora Wyacott quiltsenmeer.nl quiltwinkel in Den Bosch, St.Jorisstraatadvent panel fabric Flora Wyacott quiltsenmeer.nl quiltwinkel in Den Bosch, St.Jorisstraat
advent panel fabric Flora Wyacott quiltsenmeer.nl quiltwinkel in Den Bosch, St.Jorisstraat
My idea is to make each square into a pocket. That will be 24 lined and interfaced patch pockets that are then sewn onto a back ground fabric, in a not quite precise composition. Then add batting and backing to that and quilt it together by hand with thick thread for visible handstitching. Add straps to hang it. Give it a nice border.

Today I washed and pressed the fabric and made a try-out of my idea with some quilting fabric I had and some other fabric. I hope to take it to the shop soon for feed back.

Start by interfacing the pocket, I used Vlieseline G700, the woven multi-purpose interfacing. Sew RS together with a piece of lining, I used some shirt cotton I had left of my monkey dress shirt. Trim:
try out of a quilted advent calendar pocket for a fabric panel I bought that had 24 images to be converted to pockets. Quilt.

Turn, press and topstitch the top which will be the opening of the pocket:
try out of a quilted advent calendar pocket for a fabric panel I bought that had 24 images to be converted to pockets. Quilt.

Sew the pocket to the back ground fabric (backstitch a bit at the tops of the vertical lines):
try out of a quilted advent calendar pocket for a fabric panel I bought that had 24 images to be converted to pockets. Quilt.

Add batting and a backing fabric and quilt it together with handdyed sock yarn from Adventsbox 2017 by Wolbeest:
try out of a quilted advent calendar pocket for a fabric panel I bought that had 24 images to be converted to pockets. Quilt.try out of a quilted advent calendar pocket for a fabric panel I bought that had 24 images to be converted to pockets. Quilt.
The backside is a sturdy canvas:
try out of a quilted advent calendar pocket for a fabric panel I bought that had 24 images to be converted to pockets. Quilt.

I have many questions and I hope to visit the quilt store this week. It’s a lovely store and they host quilting bees.

Some of my questions are:

Will sock yarn be good enough for quilting? It’s a bit elastic. Will it keep the quilt together when it’s hanging on the wall, filled with presents?

Also: is there too much contrast between the interfaced pocket and the hand stitching? I like the look of the handstitching. But the interfacing will help and keep the picture of each panel nice and crisp.
Perhaps I should give each panel a bit of backing instead of interfacing? Perhaps quilt them a bit too, by hand? (I think I quite like to handstitch, it is a lovely and serene activity.)

I look forward to the opinion of the lovely lady who runs the shop. And ofcourse I need background fabric. I’m thinking silver and light blue. And I need to be educated about batting.

new cufflinks and fabric

These are the cufflinks I own at the moment:
collage cufflinks

This is what gives me great pleasure in sewing and wearing tailored ladies’ dress shirts. French cuffs, fun fabric, good fit, good arm movement.

Most cufflinks are hand made and bought on Etsy.  The wooden ones -both the square ones and the ebony with silver- are from Ukrainian artist Lexwoody on Etsy

The silver ones -hare, deer, flower- are handcast high quality pewter by master artisan William Sturt from High Country Pewter.

The porcelain ones with the rose are vintage. They were from my mother or even my grandmother. These are the cuffs that started this whole love affair, back in the ’80s, when I found a white blouse in the shops that had French cuffs.

Last week I bought some more cotton for dress shirts to go with these cufflinks:
katoentjes stoffen bloezen Steff’s Stoffen in Veghel

And then I bought some more cufflinks, in China:
cufflinks collage sept 2018

Experiment: dress with continuous hem.

Say you have a fabric with a continuous line of cars. And you have a dress pattern with multiple panels but because you lack hips or a butt all seams are pretty much straight down from the hip line.
Could you line up the panels and cut the dress in one continuous pattern?
naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

I asked my sewing teacher and she laughed out loud and then she looked at me strange and then she went to make us a cup of tea and when she came back she had a plan and we had fun pouring over a piece of trial canvas that I brought. End result first: naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

You can’t just lay down the pieces next to each other, that would add all the seam allowance (SA) to the circumference of the dress. So you’ve gotta be smart.
You also have to think about how you would treat where the fabric transitions from one piece to two pieces seamed together.
Thirdly my teacher came up with the idea of connecting the panels at the top, where you would otherwise sew them together, and treat the seam between them as a dart.

This is the line where the hips are. The SA of 1 cm should be sewn everywhere or this dress will be too floppy.
naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

We connected the front side panel and the front side side panel. The “hole” will be a dart now. I am anxious what this will do for fit. This pattern fits so well and precise. naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

We did the same at the back panels:
naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

Copying the darts onto the fabric and also to the other side. Mark with pins and draw on the other side. Work one dart at the time so you won’t confuse yourself with pins on the under side:

naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurknaailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurknaailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk
Working with this chalk makes broader lines than I like, because I pay attention to every millimeter. I should ease up, this fabric is on the sturdy side, it needs some millimeters for turn of cloth and the like.

Cutting!
naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

Cut:
naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk
From top to bottom: frontpanel on the fold, side panels but only the parts with the pocket, to the left of them the upper side of these panels (they will connect in the pocket), side back panels, back panels which will have a zipper.

One piece:
naailes experiment jurk uit 1 stuk canvas autojurk

Next: reinforce neck line so it won’t stretch during handling. Sew in darts. Attach loose panels onto pocket parts. Add facing in neckline and arm holes.

Continuing next Wednesday.

The dark leaves dress, slightly stretchy woven cotton.

Finished a dress, in brushed cotton with a slight stretch widthwise. I can just about pull this dress over my head, no zipper needed. It has pockets:
dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehvdress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

The two front panels with a pocket. The edge of the pocket is reinforced with a piece of non-stretch band.
dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

First the long seam was sewn and finished. The the pocket was finished. This is the underside of the pocket, the part that will touch my body: dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

The other long seams were not finished straight away. First I tried on the dress for fit. I had to find out how the wearing ease was. It’s the same pattern as for my woven cotton dress shirts.
It is too wide:
dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehvdress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

It needs about this much taken out:
dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehvdress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

Me and my sewing instructor pinned the seams where needed and I sewed the new lines, amended again where necessary. When finished and content I added the changes to the paper pattern pieces. I now have a go to pattern for slightly stretchy woven fabrics.
If I add a Centre Back to the pattern pieces and some seam allowance I can add a zipper. I wonder if I can then sew this pattern in a non-stretchy woven. Or whether I need more wearing ease for wearing and not for just getting in the dress.

New side view:
dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

Neckline facing: underlined with vlieseline (a quality version my sewing instructor gave me, not the cheap stuff you can buy at any fabric store). Edges clipped before pressing and topstitching:

dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

To prevent flipping up I have tacked down the facing in a couple of places, using dark thread and a dark spot in the fabric pattern:
dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

I’ve now learned to treat a square neckline with a facing. It’s not briljant yet. But I do love the look of a square neckline. Looking forward to utilize it on the many sturdy and beautiful canvas fabrics I’ve encountered. Such as print “Admiral” from PT Design in the UK and their print On the Road:

Very happy with my new dress:

dress dark flowers fabric sewing Ehv

Circus blouse, from before Trekkersbloes

Sewed before the Mrs. Engineer Machinery Blouse.
circus bloes

I love this blouse. I am wearing it right now!

This one has darling fabric and owl buttons: circusbloescircus bloes

I put the buttons down close to each other at the apex of the bust, for more closure: circusbloes

Oops! I put the right sleeve in the left armhole and vice versa….
circus bloes
I’m wearing it nonetheless. I put in two extra buttons in the sleeve slits to prevent gaping. The slits are finished with a continuous bound placket.
It’s OK but I don’t mind putting in a real sleeve placket. It’s about as much work for me.

some study shirts from before

Blue sleeveless shirt, sewn before Trekkersbloes and Pink Fern and Ehv Kawaii.
blauwe bloesje korte mouwen

Studying fit and princess lines and arm hole and neckline. Collar obviously too wide for the stand. Neckline too roomy. Simple treatment of the button band. This is a very wearable and versatile Summer blouse. blauwe bloesje korte mouwen

First I tried finishing the arm holes with biaisband. It failed:
blauwe bloesje armsgat biaisband

Attaching collar, following the sequence my sewing teacher advised: blauwe bloesje armsgat biaisband
Attach collar to collar stand. Then attach the whole to the bodice. I’m not very good at this sequence. The topstitching and having a neat fit at the buttonbands has failed.

blauwe bloesje korte mouwen

Very comfortable fit. Here it still has the low hem at the back. This was changed in later versions of this pattern:

blauwe bloesje korte mouwen

Fitted dress shirt with French cuffs

sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric

The fit is nice. Armhole and sleeve are very good. Neckline of the pattern will be raised (by a whopping 3 centimeters! More than one inch.) Shorten sleeve.sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabricsewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabricsewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabricsewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric
The collar tips flip upwards. Tack down with buttons. Collar stand misses button.

The neckline was amended a bit to prevent gaping that occured in the previous blouse. I folded a bit in the curve and kept the Centre Front straight:
patroondelen trekkersbloes

French cuff and nice sleeve placket:

sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabricsewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric Cufflinks from Ukrainian artist Lexwoody on Etsy The cuff sits fine. Sleeve is a bit too long though. The pattern is amended and I now have a definitive pattern piece for my sleeve. Going with the Bunka arm hole. Sleeve fits perfectly, there is no need to ease it in. sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric

Extra buttons to keep the collar edges down. They were flipping up: sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric

Just a little button. Sewn in the same direction as the button that closes the collar stand. sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric

A bit of protection at the wrong side of the fabric so the button will not tear through the single layer of fabric. I tried to finish it neatly:

sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric

Also note the topstitching on the collar stand. I have issues with getting it neat. Victims of the Sewing On Buttons Without The Button Foot Trial of Summer 2018: sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric

I could pin down the button fine with just the empty shaft. But these kind of buttons will make the shaft sproing away and the needle would smack into the (plastic) button. sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric sewing a tailored ladies’ dress shirt with French cuffs and cunstruction vehicle fabric

Much better. I am getting there! Just one more dress shirt. With a raised neckline and shorter sleeve. And further practise on getting the topstitching on the collar stand right.

The seam allowance is brought back to only 1 cm and now all pattern pieces fit on one width of cloth (of 1.40 m): patroondelen trekkersbloes

I’m using the same pieces for a dress and they fit beautifully:
patroondelen jurk op 1 stofbreedte//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js