Sewing some parts of the Birds in Shoes Shirt.

Collar.

Using this tutorial from Sewaholic. Excellent work and site.
sleeve sleevecap fit shirt arm hole
I used fusible interfacing on this one.

I made the mistake all novice sewers make:
dreint a collar
I clipped too close to the edge and/or used a pointy thing to try and make a nice point.

Next time I’ll employ one of the tricks I found on the web. One is using a surgical clamp to get a good grip on the point before turning it inside out.
The other one is this beauty, from Off the Cuff, a blog about expert shirt sewing by Pamely Emy:

using a temporarily thread to catch the point.

collar point technique by Pamela Emy

Off the Cuff is a great site with expert information on sewing dress shirts. I’m sorry mrs. Emy doesn’t blog anymore, due to health issues I believe. I hope she still sews and has many good days.

My collar point topstitched:
dreint a collar

Sleeves.

I inserted my Crazy Comfortable sleeve pattern. I now think that the reason they actually work so well is because they’re on the bias… not so much because of the crazy pattern (wide flat shoulder cap. I say “flat” but it’s actually concave.) Anyway. Sewed them in. Pressed good. Added a single needle top stitch to secure the seam.

Now pinking the left over edge:
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How are these seams finished on high end dress shirts? Surely not serged/overlocked. Felled seams probably. Ah yes, I’ve found some things on the net, one of them, again, an excellent instruction from the Off the Cuff blog.

I’ve now ordered the book on which Sewaholic based her collar-tutorial was: Shirtmaking: Developing Skills For Fine Sewing by David Page Coffin.

51wyjnjldbl-_sx401_bo1204203200_ I hope to learn much from it.

Zipper placket.
It’s not done, a zipper in a shirt. But my machine can’t make button holes and I don’t like to make them by hand. Not yet anyway. I’m sewing a zipper.

I’ve attached a separate placket for it. Did some folding to get the sequence right. The precise cutting I do was very helpful, I could just lay the edges against each other (“flush”?) and treat them as one.

First I attached the zipper to the front and the placket. Then I folded back the front and the placket and sewed a nice top stitch line. Which wrinkled as I progressed with the needle:

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Because you should always press. Duh.

After pressing it looked better and it sewed much better too:

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You could press the plackets first, to bring some idea of purpose into the band:
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Collar stand.
Upon fitting I saw how awful and weird the button plackets looked as they went up vertical above the zipper. Following the Centre Front line right up. Because that’s where all the buttons were supposed to go in the original pattern. I amended the pattern to not have overlapping plackets. But I didn’t amend it for height and it looks awful with the zipper not closing the gap all the way. (and you don’t want a zipper all the way to the top)

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I also found out that the collar stand I had cut didn’t fit the neck line anymore, it was too short. Don’t know how that happened as I followed the Knip pattern for the neck exactly because I hadn’t learned anything about necklines or collar (stands) yet.

I solved both by folding back the button (zipper) placket. Something else Not Done in sewing. It’s more of a dirty hack than anything else and I’m not proud. But it gets me a front that works and by now this shirt has become a wearable practise shirt so here goes:
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Fold away and topstitch in place. Awful. But functional.
Now I’ve got an acceptable shape at the front edges. (note to self: a next shirt with a zipper needs it to close a bit higher. About 5 cm.)

Now I could attach a collar stand that fits to that, I learned how to draw one at drafting lessons last Monday. No need though because the original collar stand now fits again, if I shape the rounded edges freehand. (Something else that’s going to get me in trouble. Symmetry is very important at this point of the body.)

Todays task is to finish those round edges of the collar stand and perhaps assemble the collar to it. Again using Sewaholic’s tutorials.

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I’ve trimmed the seams on the inside of the collar stand a bit. It was six layers thick and it will receive three more layers from the collar. That’s just too much difference from the single layer of fabric that’s the rest of the shirt.

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Self drafted sleeveless Summer Dress

A simple Summer Dress based on the one in the previous post: a shift dress with some shaping in both the side seams and the back. Pockets. And I did a new thing to add some shaping in the front: I gathered under the breasts with some elastic and two buttons to keep it in place.
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two long darts in the back, they’re more like princess lines. (one still wonky on this picture, I unpicked it and redid it)

To add some shaping to the front, to prevent “tent like appearance” I gathered some of the fabric right under each breast.
There’s a horizontal dart running across the front panel, it angles upwards near the sides (but not on the first picture, this sat awful on my body, I remedied it after the picture).
I threaded a double thread of thin elastic through the outer most 20 centimeters of this dart.
I gathered the elastic and secured it with a button on each side. So 4 buttons for the whole dress.
Zomerjurk met zakken en soort van empire waist line

Zomerjurk met zakken en soort van empire waist line

The buttons where first put in to anchor the elastic while I could still adjust it. Then I thought: why not keep the buttons?

It follows my own body shape: fairly straight outlines but quite curvy when seen from the sides.

(the folds in the lower part of the side seam are caused by the pocket)

Edges are bound of with a biais band that I found that matches the fabric very nicely:
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Here’s the solution I tried for biais band and getting it to sit right and being able to give it nice top stitching while securing the back at the same time.
Start from the wrong side. DON’T SEW ON THE FOLDED LINE.
Instead sew somewhere in the middle of the piece between the fold and the edge of the binding band:
Zomerjurk met zakken en soort van empire waist line
This step is meant to secure the band to the fabric.
Next you fold the biais band like it’s supposed to and you stitch very close to the edge, from the right side. If the band is folded properly it will catch the back side close at the edge too. The back side will not slip because it’s already secured in place.

For the hem I used my antique tool to keep the same distance all around. Fold under and fold under again. The second time I used matching coloured thread. I’ve folded the fabric so you can see the end result.
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I like neat topstitching so much, I tried it on the bust dart. I put on the dress and determined where and how it should be. Then I just pinned it down and stitched very careful.
Zomerjurk met zakken en soort van empire waist line
A top stitched bust dart.
It was prompted because I tried on the dress, determined where the dart ought to be and then had difficulty transferring that information to the inside of the dress and stitch it there.

An alternative is probably to put on the dress inside out and determine where the dart should be.

French seams. Including the pockets.
Zomerjurk met zakken en soort van empire waist line

And to end with the beginning: this is how I cut the fabric. I used the green dress as a template. Added a generous seam allowance along the sides for French seams. Added no seam allowance along the arm holes because I knew I was going to bind them in biais band.
Again with a brushy reminder to cut pockets.
Zomerjurk met zakken en soort van empire waist line
When I sewed the side seams and tried it on for fit I had to take out nearly all the curvyness: at the bust and at the hem. I had weird “bingo wings” flapping at the side seams there.

Green skirt in progress: misunderstandings

I marked out where the zipper was going to end. I’ve determined the waist band will be 3 cm wide, just over an inch. This is how it will sit and where I’ll stop sewing at the bottom.
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Following Corinne Leigh’s tutorial at youtube Craftovision channel about sewing an invisible zipper. I did fine. Put it in:

Sewed shut the side seam. Noticed error.

Clearly I had not understood the tutorial well. The white “lips” of the zipper are peaking out from the seam.

Here’s where I did something wrong. Corinne says to start sewing the side seam as close as you can to the point where you stopped sewing the zipper. I must have misunderstood where that’s supposed to be exactly.

I took out a bit and tried how it was supposed to look before I sewed it like this:

Much better!

But now I had been a tad enthousiastic and sewn a bit more higher up than supposed to. The zipper will boink into the stitching and not into the zipper stop at the bottom of the zipper. It’s only a question of 1 mm but still enough to harass that stitching, especially that one lone stitch:

It needed some fortification. I took the left over thread after I snipped it after sewing and thread it through a needle and whipped it through a couple of times. Only through the white zipper fabric, not the green fashion fabric.
It’s a zipper stop of some sorts. Just enough to fortify that lone stitch at the picture above.

Here you see it from the inside:

Next. After fitting I saw that the fit was good. So I pressed open the seams.
No need to finish them, they are already finished.
The first side seam shows I’m still getting used at working with broad (= 1/2″) seam allowance. Here I was squeemish:

At the other seam I had grown bolder:

Next: the darts.
My projected darts would work fine: both front and back would have two darts, each 3″ from the centerline.
Front darts would each have 1/2″ in width and 2″ in length.
Back darts would have 3/4″ width each and 4 1/2″ in length.

I located them, drew them, pinned them, sewed them.
Then this.

The silk had not stayed close to the fabric. Not at the point of the dart.
I tried the skirt on and though the width is ok, the darts end in ugly puckers now that the actual fashion fabric doesn’t receive the start of the dart in a smooth curved angle.
So these have to come out.
And I used a tiny stitch width to make for extra nice looking darts…

in progress: Green skirt with pocket

When I bought this cabin it came with all the stuff that was already in it. Furnishings, old calendars, gnomes. And lots of ’70s bedlinen.
I’ve treasured my favourite for years now and today I’m making one of its pillow cases into a skirt. With a pocket.

For this I used video’s from Corinne Leigh of Craftovision to draw up a simple pattern and to understand the sequence of steps. I threw in some haute couture sewing techniques and some things I learned from the previous skirts.

Corinne Leigh explained measurements and I drew them on my folded pillow cover and just cut two panels out in one go. Afterwards I amended the topline of just the front panel.
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This really is a pillow case! Look at the backside of the left over after cutting:

I hope to use this left over fabric for a pocket. The left over on the long side (on the left here) will hopefully give a waist band.

These are the measurements I used and I did them all in inches, just because Corinne did so too and my measuring tape has both centimeters and inches:

  • a quart waist = 8 5/8″ (this includes 1/2″ ease and 1/2″ dart)
  • a quart hip = 9 7/8″ (this includes 1/2″ ease)
  • length between hip and waist = 6″
  • the CF dips 1/2″ under the original horizontal line. CB should be raised half an inch but I didn’t want to waste the fabric.
  • total skirtlength 22″ (if you run straight down from the hips you’ll need a split or a vent. Or flare out a bit)
  • I know from previous skirts my front darts need to be no longer than 5 cm/ 2″
  • the back darts can be 10 to 12 cm (4 to 5 “)
  • I cut everything with 1/2″ seam allowance

In Dutch and centimeters:

  • kwart middellijn = 22 cm breed (met 1,25 cm dart en 1,25 cm ease)
  • kwart heupbreedte = 25 cm
  • hoogte tussen taille en heup = 15,25 cm
  • CF ligt 1,25 cm lager dan @sideseam voor voorpand. CB juist 1,25 cm hoger
  • voordart niet langer dan 5 cm, achterdart kan wel 10 cm lang
  • bij dit patroon zit nog geen naadtoeslag/seam allowance

I took the front panel and cut it again in pongé (habutai) silk as a lining/facing. Pillow cases from the ’70s tend to be see through…
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I did the same for the back panel.

This time around I’m a good little sewer: I’m pressing! I bought a small, light weight iron (HEMA, 10 euro). Still got no iron board here but some old sheets on this Ingo table from IKEA will do. Ingo withstands the heat well.
Only thing is: he’s a bit low. Ingo makes for back pain when pressing. Here one panel is still not pressed:
Either way: nice materials to work with. Pressing does make for nicer sewing.

Next, I sewed the silk to their respective panel. Using an extra sharp silk needle (microtex, a thoughtful gift from my friend Marianne) and a very small sewing allowance, just 1/8th of an inch or even less.
I pressed the seams but didn’t fold the cotton, only the silk.

This is a prelimenary step and now I will treat the double-fabric-panels as if they’re made of one fabric. This is all a trick to have a nice seam finish on the inside later on. That’s a good thing when you’re working with silk.
Here are the two panels. Still separate. One is turned right side out, the other one still wrong side out so you can see how small the seam allowance is I used.
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Isn’t this fabric GREAT?

Before I go further I need to refer back to the video because Corinne put in a stay seam at the top (clever couture technique!) but I don’t remember in which phase she did this.

Next steps:

  1. put zipper in sideseam. The teeth of the zipper will protrude above my panel top because there will be a waist band added which will match the zipper in height. Have to decide about height of waist band before determining where the zipper will end in the side seam.
  2. sew the two panels together at the sideseams, leaving a split at the hem for movement and on one seam a split of the zipper at the top.
  3. fit. If fit then estimate wether darts will be correct both in width and length. Press side seams open.
  4. sew and press darts.
  5. waistband: cut it, press it, sew it.
  6. fit. Estimate hem length. Mark it. Think about where the pocket will be and if reinforcement is needed. Attach this now if it’s needed. Soon the interior will not be accessible anymore.
  7. fold, press and sew hem.
  8. make pocket and attach it

I have my eye on a fun little pocket! With a knotted entry.

A sewn kajak/ kayak

Today I took my handsewn kayak to the water for the very first time.

Kayak

I made it back in 2007, in a course in Norway under supervision of Anders Thygesen, the Kayakspecialist.
He has various ‘patterns’ for specific uses: long daytrip-kayaks or swift cutting through the surf-kayaks and many more.

They are all tailormade: first length is determined, based on desired main use of the kayak and your length.
Then you sit in a “toile” and exact notes are made of where your feet should be met by a beam (this is where you put pressure when you use your paddle) and how far back the entrance should be and how wide. Then it’s noted where your knees are supposed to meet a support beam (this is how you keep a kayak stable, you lock in. This is how you can roll a kayak back up when you’ve gone under).

My support beam is made of a vintage piece of oak from the forest the Danish King planted to make tall ships centuries ago. I love a bit of peculiarities in any handmade thing. Anders promotes this too. He invites you to name your vessel too.
You can just see a bit of that characteristic oak beam, in the roof of the entrance.

Kayak

No screws or pins where used. They are all handmade wooden dowels.
The “ribs” were bend using steam (after laying in a Norwegian stream nearby for a night). This is the bit Anders does for you, he does this by eye and the whole hull has to be one whole, shapewise.
The fabric is regular heavy canvas, painted with some weatherproof paint. It’s the last bit to go on. First you make it into some sort of glove by sewing shut the sides and then it is pulled tightly over the frame. This takes about 5 blokes, all pulling.
Then you sew shut the last flaps and shape it properly around the tips. The seam stitches vary from flat fell and various others.
In the end a hole is cut in the middle and the entrance is made: placing the round wooden ring (this is the only bit that is glued, this and the paddle. All other wood parts are held together by dowels) and attaching the canvas to it.
Then the canvas is treated with linseed. That’s the reddish colour you see on the canvas at the inside of the wooden ring. The outside is painted with paint. (white) and I put a green coat over when I got the kayak back to Holland.

Some of the stitches used:
Kayak

Jacquard Dress: Catch Stitching for ever….

I’m still catch stitching the seams on the inside…. half an hour here, half an hour there. It needs to be done more neatly than Susan Khalje does on the course, because this dress will have no additional lining. It seems to take forever.
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Still so much to do after this…. the top, the hem, yes or no sleeves…

I was sure I’d have the Gnome Dress ready by now and could wear it to a knitters party next week. And have at least two other winter dresses ready. But all I see are miles and miles of Jacquard Dress seams.

I think I am cured from catch stitching after this… there must be another way to have nice seams when you don’t have a serger.

FO: Faraday’s cage


I have build myself a Faraday’s cage.
It will shield my body from all the High Frequency Radiation that’s going on, from sources such as mobile phone networks and wifi.

The fabric is Silver Tulle from Yshield.com, a jersey fabric that has a silver coating. This is one of the highest shielding materials, shielding up to 50 dB at 1 GigaHerz.

Sewing jersey is a pain. It stretches a lot. The company offers a sewing service but they warn that it is difficult for them to sew to very precise measurements with this fabric. The lady I spoke to on the phone genuinely wished me good luck when I told her I’d be sewing myself. Luckily I only need to sew some straight lines, along the selvedge of the fabric.
Faraday cage yshield silver tulle
With shielding material it is important that there are no holes in the construction to let any of those little radiation waves through and especially the seams need to be folded over. Here the jersey worked to my advantage. As any knitted fabric it has the tendency to roll. I put the two pieces right sight to wrong side, so they wanted to roll together, and sewed the seam.

Indeed it rolled and it is now part of a perfectly closed cage of Faraday:
Faraday cage yshield silver tulle

The frame consists of the flexible tubes I got from a children’s playhouse:
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I put it on its side, removed the cloth (which made the tubes SPROIING! into round hoops).
I keep them in a longer, flatter shape with some woven bands.
Faraday cage yshield silver tulle
I specifically chose my most favourite band, purchased to use on clothing, many years ago. As I’ll be spending many an hour in this tent I like something nice to look at. It is also why I have them with the nice side facing inwards.
I attached snaps at the ends. This way I can amend the shape and the measurements of the tent any time I want to. This current shape is excellent for laying in it and reading. But I think I also want a shape that’s good for sitting upright, perhaps while watching tv and/or knitting.

Tubes with fabric draped over it:
Faraday cage yshield silver tulle

Entrance through the side:
Faraday cage yshield silver tulle

Once inside I fold the fabric under so the fabric overlaps all around. No holes or gaps.

It works!
Faraday cage yshield silver tulle

Cutting a silverlined fabric? Don’t use your good cloth scissors! Use the bleu paper pair.
Faraday cage yshield silver tulle

Next week I’ll take it to the city and take my daily rests in it. I wonder what the outcome will be! But first I need to put in a felted underlayer. That way the cat can join me. She really wants to but the fabric is too vulnerable for her love stamping feet clawing.
Also, silver has a tendency to discolour, as you know. That is why I can expect discolouration from oxidation and from the oils in my hands. Not to worry. A true testing engineer doesn’t mind 😉

Then a big thank you to Yshield.com in Germany. It’s with them that I bought this fabric. Their customer service is excellent. They are very friendly and personally oriented. And they know their technical stuff.
I called them early one morning to ask a question I had mentioned the evening before by email and the lady answering didn’t need no introduction, as soon as she heard my name she switched to English and knew what I was talking about. A really good company I gladly recommend.

Delivery was fast, free and well secured:
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I am not paid for this endorsement.

Jacquard Dress: pressing seams

The long seams I basted I have now sewn. Before focussing on details such as fitting at the top, shoulders, sleeves (?) and hem I will finish the seams. Because it builds confidence and gives a sense of getting things done.

The seams are quite rough. With big irregular allowances and fraying at the edges. Susan Khaljé knows just what to do: sandwich pressing, pressing, trimming and overcasting. This is Lesson 9 of The Couture Dress on Craftsy.

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Because I’m in the city which has an ironing board but no iron I decided to buy a second iron. Not a heavy duty things like the Official Ironing Iron I have (at the cabin, without a board) but a small, handy thingy. Just prefect for seams, not so handy for big sheets of fabric.

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It’s a 10 euro steam iron from the HEMA. It fits very well in my hand. I like it. It only has 1200 Watt and I kept an eye open to see if this would give enough heat. It does.

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So I pressed my seams. First sandwich: press the seams without opening them. From both sides. Then open and press it open. All the while using a bit of steam. Pressing is always with steam.

I used a rolled up towel to press the curves.

Then I trimmed the seam allowances. I plan to catch stitch the edges later on, attaching them to the lining.

Because I had to switch around the pattern pieces there is one place where the seam is dangerously close to the edge of the lining. I have marked it with a ‘red cross of pins’ so I can give it some extra TLC before finishing the seam.
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not a dress: Planning a Faraday Cage

It has been a long time desire of mine to make a Faraday cage. Just a cage to rest in and be free from all kinds of wifi networks and telephone networks, just for a little while. Allow my body to rest and reset.

Years ago I made a kayak by hand. It consisted of carved wooden sticks, bend with steam, and canvas pulled tight over it. All finished with watertight seam (fell seams of some sort).
It was made in the Inuit tradition as taught by Anders Thygesen, in Norway.


Ever since I had in mind to make a cage like that: a wooden frame with shielding fabric around it. An organic formed cage to rest in. To sleep in.
Back then I searched for these fabrics but they were too expensive and only available for industrial users. A few years have gone by and now these materials are retailed to costumers. But I didn’t know this. I did come to talk about this dream with two new friends of mine, Pimmie and Bloempje, who have plans to spin metal yarn and knit the fabric themselves.

My desire rekindled, I made a solid resolution: 2014 was going to be the year I was making myself a Faraday cage! I had no idea how but I’ve noticed that when I make resolutions like that somehow things fall into place.

Still I was utterly surprised when I met a wonderful lady who has shielded her whole house and her body because she is VERY sensitive. She showed me her travel-cage, for overnight stays (such as the wool spin retreat where Pimmie and I went and met her). She let me experience the cage. It was ok. A bit warm. I didn’t feel much relief of wifi but we talked and I learned a lot about shielding.
Then I left the cage.

My body bucked at the new exposure to the wifi (which was very strong at the retreat). I’ve never experienced something like that and I didn’t expect to. My hands became sweaty and red -a typical vegetal reaction of my body- and somehow my head clamped up, somewhere behind my jaws. Of course my blood pressure plummeted and I had to flop in a chair.
The Faraday lady was not surprised one bit!

Anyway. We talked and she gave me LOTS of information and she showed me the websites of retailers. I was so glad. My resolution was looking good to transfer into reality!

Back home, when I lay awake at night, I’ve started to ponder my cage. Dimensions. The experience I had and what to learn from it. The fabric I had tested and its characteristics. How to make a construction so it wouldn’t be too claustrophobic. (The right fabric is lined with silver which isn’t exactly transparent and doesn’t allow much fresh air trough)
And there’s the problem of my cat who insists on sleeping on my bed covers and greeting me at my pillow twice a night. Her claws could easily tear the fabric and a tear in a Faraday cage is much worse than a whole.

So I was just mentally playing with this puzzle, hour after hour. Without any hurry or worry because New Year is still a long way away and this is an interesting case.

Then I remembered I once bought some kind of collapsable playhouse…
Meant to sit in on Summer evenings in the woods here near the cabin, with a musquito net over it. Which of course I’ve never done.

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This could work as the frame of my cage! Cut away the fabric, use the structure. But it is a bit big. The fabric to cover it with is very expensive (about $117 for 3 yards)(86 euro per meter) so any yard I can save is money for free chocolate.

Well, this evening I’m playing some more … laying in it. Measuring it. Thinking out ways to cut the fabric as sparsely as possible. Remembering to allow for folded seams. Remembering how overlap to make a good cage. Thinking of combining it with a conducting floor mat of cheaper material. How to ground the thing. It’s a nice puzzle to play with for a sewist engineer!

And you know how playing goes in my house:

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Just a few more days and I probably have this puzzle solved.
Then I’m ordering the fabric. Which could mean that a early as next week I could have some crude Faraday cage to rest in!
And one 2014 New Years resolution to cross off!

Couture Dress: fitting the muslin

I’ve fitted the muslin a couple of times. Made some changes in between. Fitted it again. Changed things. Fitted it some more. Laid it on a chair for a couple of weeks.
That’s a trusted way of proving sewing work, didn’t you know? It’s like good wine or bread dough, it has to have some time to make up its mind. * see foot note

The fitting is done. Now it’s time to take the muslin apart. I had one hour before reclining to the couch again (from where I’m writing you this)

Taking apart the muslin really is just a bit of work. The important thing is to carefully note all the changes you make. I used a green pen to draw the new sewing lines before taking them apart. Then, as soon as a seam was gone, I made sure to remove the stitching lines in black that were no longer relevant. They’d been replace by green pen lines in places.
If I don’t make very clear to myself which lines are the right ones I’ll go doubting further along in the process. Or worse: try and be smart(er).

Marking the new seam with green pen, before and after ripping the seam:
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Before doing anything else: ripping out the obsolete black lines:
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I am marking the new sewing lines on both sides of the fabric. I don’t know yet which side I’ll use as a template. Better be safe.
To mark a line on the right side of the fabric where you cannot see the seam I use this technique:
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I’ve made small stripes across the seam, marking the fabric on both sides of it. (I’ll now flip over the fabric and trace the seam on the wrong side, on both pieces of fabric. This is easy.)
When I rip the seam the small marks will still be there when I fold open the fabric (and a small line of puncture dots. But don’t be fooled, I’ve resewn many seams while adjusting this muslin and I’ll easily loose track of which puncture dots are the line I want to mark)
The line I want will be where the small stripes have a sharp break.

I’d show you more clearly what I mean but it’s couchy time now… perhaps I have another hour tomorrow.

footnote:

Here’s what really caused me to take so much time off sewing:

it was a lot of work fitting and changing the muslin, I was loosing my motivation a bit. So I sewed that bag and that skirt in between, that was fun!

In the mean time I’d been on holiday and had to recuperate from that for a couple of weeks. Meaning I couldn’t sit up long enough to sew or stand long enough to fit properly. I did a bit here and there, trying to leave myself good notes. But that didn’t work and every time I took up the muslin I had to fit it first again to understand what I was talking about.

Then, when I was a bit better I wore my working skirt for the first time, it was a Sunday morning. Suddenly a big dog came onto our terrain and chased our cat high up in a tree. I had to run outside and zipped up the skirt in a hurry, breaking the zipper in the process. The dog then jumped into our pond but came running when I bellowed for it. It pranced beside me to its owner, all the while streaking me with dirt and water.
Then we had to talk the cat down who was in shock. That’s when my broken, filthy skirt fell down to my ankles.

That’s when I lost the will to sew for a couple of weeks… Add another episode or two where my health took a blow and demanded some recuperation time en here we are, months along before I finally got my hands on the Couture Dress again.

But now I’m playing again! As soon as I have the chance I’ll work on it some more. I decided to make a practice dress first, without lining. Just so I have something to wear and something to play with. I’m a bit afraid to cut into the gnome fabric. First I want to get the pattern right.
I’m looking forward to playing and making a practice dress.