Finished: a little project bag

Made from a linen jacket I bought in the last century.
When you haven’t worn something in 10 years, you’ll probably won’t wear it again, won’t you? I know things come back in fashion every 25 years but not this jacket.
Nice fabric though. Pure linen.

Linnen projecttasje

It’s a knotted bag, with one handle bigger than the other. I love having project bags that I can wear on my wrist. It keeps the yarn while I walk and knit.
Linnen projecttasje

It is lined and has a boxed bottom. And a pocket.
Linnen projecttasje
On the inside there’s another pocket.
They were on the jacket. I just cut the lower half of the jacket away and made a bag out of it.

Embellished with darling Little Red Riding Hood tape I got from Nieslief, who is very lief. (“lief” = “lovable, lovely”)

Backside:
Linnen projecttasje

FO: Japanese knot bag

My friend loves her new tote! Now I can show you what I did:

First I made enough fabric. I cut out fabric using the bag I already have as a template.

I then started sewing together fabric, within that form, to create interesting cloth. A pink strip here, a gnomey pocket there. Ad an extra line to a seam. For stability and as an eye pleasing thing.

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Untill I had enough fabric for the two sides to the bag: an inside and an outside.

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The fuchsia fabric is sturdy cotton. I chose to have the fabric fold at the bottom of the bag, making it unnecessary to cut the bottom.

Now the real sewing started. I made sure both pieces were laying with their right sides together.

I began by sewing together the top of the handles.

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Then I sewed all around the bottom of the sides. From handle to handle. Obviously I interupted this line at the bottom of the fuchsia where no seam was necessary.

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I then flipped one piece inside out and put it inside the other piece, right sides together.

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I noticed that the inside of the handles did not play well together with the outside. The soft pink one was way larger than it’s shell and it was bulking up.

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I carefully measured the difference and made a new seam at the top of the soft pink handle

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now the inner and outer seam match up nicer and there’s no bulk:

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I carefully pinned together the round parts at the top:

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sewed it:

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trimmed it, clipped it:

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I folded the bag right side out. (As by miracle the inside was right side out too.) I pinned it.

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The next day I carefully sewed a seam on the right side of the seam I had sewd the previous day.

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I then folded the seams of the holes of the handles on the sides. Pinned them. Sewed them, from the right side. Here’s the big handle in the process of pinning. I pin the outer fabric first, then match the inner fabric to that measurement.

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Here’s the small handle finished. It seems the seam has not caught all the inner fabric.

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I had to do some repairing.

Then I reinforced the lower ends of the handle holes.

All that was left now was “to weave in the ends”. That’s what knitters call it. Sewists probably say something else. “Hide the loose threads”?

Finished!

outside:

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inside:

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parcel send to my friend, she is a crocheter:

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card from Springwools.com in Dublin. International shipping at a flate rate!

Japanese Knot Bag: “rrrrrrrr…rrrrrrrrr”

I have a friend who sews amazingly cute Japanese knot bags. These bags have one long handle and one shorter one. You pull the longer one through the shorter one and hang the bag from your wrist.

They are excellent knitting/crocheting bags because they can hold the yarn while you knit away. There are no zippers or velcro to damage the yarn. And there are such great fabrics to be used!
My friend loves to use IKEA fabric or old sheets from the ’70s.
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I have at least two of her bags and I use them all the time.

One day we asked what the best way is to make these bags. This is what she said:

“First sew together the little tops of the handles. Then sew the outer edges untill the markings for the handle holes. rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr…rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.rrrrrrrrrrrrrr all the way.”

“Then: inner bag in outer bag, right sides together, the big innercircle of the handle-bag-handles….rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.”

“Clip seam allowances, turn…. right sides out. Sew the big innercircle close to the edge. rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr”

“Then the small outer circles of both handles: turn seam allowance in, pin it and then sew rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr close to the edge. At the bottom where the bag starts sew a double seam to prevent tearing = gaping of the seams…”

“Finished… With cutting the fabric and lots of pinning it takes about one hour and a half I guess?”

Yeah… left me guessing too.

Either way I’m trying to make one for another friend. With the fabric I told you about before. Which has to remain a secret.
I wanted to cut the fabric for my dress first so I’d know how much there’d be left for the bag. But that’s not happening, it seems. My dress is still at its toile-stage and has been on my chair for weeks.

But I don’t want to wait any longer with the bag. So I cut. And started sewing. Using above instructions.
I’m halfway done and once you’ve got fabric in your hands above instructions make sense!

I’ll show you pictures in a couple of days, when it’s finished and received by my friend. I hope my rrrrrrrrr-friend is proud of me.