Finished: Hoezee! dress

I combined the bodice toile I made earlier with the skirt pattern I’m now using for all skirts. I swivelled the darts around into princess seams and it resulted in this practice dress that’s quite wearable:

Untitled

It’s an ankle long dress in a bold patterned canvas. Add cat for scale:

Zipper in the side seam, lined with an old sheet. Top stitched.
I took care there were no “bulls eye” patterns over the apexes.

The lining is attached to the bodice at the top. I practised lining a bodice with it.

A high neck at the back because I get cold there. Two long darts, also in the lining.

Advertisements

New Dress: Gnomes at work.

SPOILER ALERT: I want to use some of this fabric for DE KIKKER so if you know her, please keep it a secret. And if you are De Kikker, do not scroll down.

jaja, ik heb een geheimpje voor De Kikker.  Gaan we het verklappen?

So, I’m planning a new dress, in fuchsia pink with a front panel of gnomes on wheels:

Untitled

On the left an old sheet to be used for…. backing/lining. I have not decided yet.

The pattern is based on the pattern that is used for the Crafty Course The Couture Dress by Susan Khalje: Vogue 8648

A sheet dress with princess lines and a broad band around the waist.

I’m planning to make the front panel with the gnomes but still have to decide if/how I will bring them back in the front panel of the skirt.

I traced my sloper and made the darts into princess lines.

Untitled

I must remember that these lines have not yet got ease in them.
If I use these to trace unto fabric I must add ease first.

The other decision is wether or not to line this dress. Or use backing. I’d want to because it makes finishing the seam allowances so much easier.

But the dark pink fabric is stretchy cotton (though not as stretchy as the Anemone dress). It is “keper katoen” of which I only know the Dutch name.

Where I to line or back this dress with the light pink fabric I would use a non-stretch fabric on a stretchy fabric. I have to think about that first.

What guides my thinking is how I am going to use this dress. If it’s going to be a day-to-day dress I’d like a sturdy finishing. I’ve been known to do forest maintenance and saw trees in dresses and I bought this sturdy cotton for a sturdy working dress.

Right now I am leaning towards backing the cotton and just forgetting about the slight stretchiness of the fabric. But I’ll ponder some more.

UPDATE: thought about it.

1. make a muslin. This way I can play around with the ease and I will end up with pattern pieces I can re-use. THis dress pattern will probably be a staple in my wardrobe.

2. trace the seamlines onto the light pink fabric. This will probably become a backing.

This way I get to follow all the steps in the Craftsy Course and get a chance to soak up all the knowledge I missed by merely watching the videos.

first step now: iron the muslin.
Pity I’m getting visitors at any moment now. Our coffee table is my ironing board.

UPDATE on the UPDATE: I started pressing the cotton anyway. I only get visitors who appreciate life and living 🙂

this is as far as I got before the doorbell rang.

finished: Anemone Dress

Nothing to help me finish a dress than plans to make a skirt. I really planned to blog each day this week and make a simple skirt! I read the instructions, fondled my fabric. And then somehow spend my sewing time finishing the dress I’ve been avoiding for weeks.

Meet my Anemone Dress:
UntitledUntitled

It’s a sheat dress, using my sloper as a pattern. I transformed the bust darts into princess lines. Only at the front though. And only after I tried it on for fit.

This is stretchy cotton fabric so I thought I might get away with zero ease. I did. (I started out with cutting the dress with plenty of ease, basting it together to check the fit and eventually it turned out zero ease was fine)

UntitledUntitled

The fabric is a first for me: cotton with a bit of elastaan/elastine. I bought it by accident in the fabric shop in the next town over. I went there to support a small shop and to feel the fabric before I bought it. And to celebrate me with linen and make a dress as explained in the Craftsy Course The Couture Dress by Susan Khalje.

As I was chattering about that it was made clear that that was an old fashioned approach, using an interlining ánd a lining. Why not use a modern fabric that behaves all by itself? It’s so much easier! Here, like this one. Which colour do you like?
A zipper to go with that. Thread in the right colour. Some bias band. There you go, have fun.

I fell into that trap. The one where you doubt yourself and your plans. Where you rely on the expert. Only to come home and find you’re left with more answers. Like:

Q: How to finish the seam allowance if there’s no interlining to stitch it to? (And no serger or locking machine or zig zag on my sewing machine or even pinking shears)

Q: What kind of stitch does stretchy fabric require?

Now, a month later, I am very pleased with the dress I finished today. But I had to steer my head in a whole other direction to work with this fabric. I wanted to focus on the shape but instead had to focus on the material. For this I studied online and asked my sewist friends questions. But I’m still a bit annoyed that I let myself be taken from the intentioned path.

A: The seam allowance I folded under and stitched. Pressed open and left them as be. Some parts I gave a whip stitch finish.

A: for the side seams: just a straight stitch. Make sure you don’t stretch the fabric while sewing, let the machine transport the fabric. Having an old fashioned treadle machine was an advantage: it already has the small hole in the footer nowadays used for silks. My machine won’t “eat” the fabric and will not pull it down into the underbelly of the machine.
For seams that need to remain stretchy: the catch stich.

Untitled
from the book Couture Sewing Techniques by Claire B Shaeffer, one of the best books out there. She not only shows how, she explains why. Which helped me to couple this stitch to this fabric.

I finished a lot of details by hand. The edges, the armholes, the hem, the splits. It’s ok. Handstitching is not that much of a job, it doesn’t take that long. 45 minutes for the hem. Take it outside, sit in the shade, enjoy a little calm.

Front panel folded down and stitched in place at the sides. Inside:
Untitled

Right side:
UntitledUntitled

The hem and neckline I folded under and sewed with the catch stitch, leaving small pricks of thread visible in the fabric, from the outside right side. With the wild print it’s ok.

Hem, catch stitch, from the inside and from the right side:
Untitled
Untitled

neckline at the back:
Untitled
Untitled

The inside of the dress is not very neat but the outside looks good and it wears well. That’s all I ask at the moment. Other people might find sheer glee at knowing their dress looks at good on the inside as it does on the outside but I am not there yet. I might never get there.
Untitled

Now let’s talk about the shape of things.
First of all, on the cloths hanger the dress doesn’t look very good. It’s crooked. You can see how one shoulder is not the mirror image of the other one:
Untitled
But on me it sits well:
Untitled
(if you would kindly ignore the fold in my waist and just concentrate on the shoulder and neckline)
That’s a difference between Ready To Wear (RTW) and hand tailored dresses, writes Claire B. Shaeffer. RTW looks good in the shop, tailored clothes look good on a person.

OK, now I am ready to talk about that fold of fabric in my side. It is there because when I stand up straight I stand up crooked. Yes. I am standing straight in all these pictures. I am a twisted kind of person, I curve naturally. I really thought and felt as if I was standing straight up.

This is me standing straight:
UntitledUntitled
SWOING! Would you believe it?! My one hip is higher, my one leg gets less weight, my shoulder compensates my being lifted. I should be called “Mrs. S”
(I wonder if this has to do with the knee surgery I had as a teen, for years I didn’t put weight on my left leg and still have to correct myself often and distribute weight to it. How very annoying! This way, I might grow into a twisted old lady.)
Without a mirror or these pictures I would not believed I was in fact standing not straight.

In the sloper there is a correction for the folds of extra fabric this creates. It’s both in the back and in the side:

I did not apply it in this dress because it has long princess lines and no horizontal cut at the waist where I could take out the extra fabric. I did baste in the side “thingy to take out the extra fabric” but it showed in the fabric print and just wasn’t nice. So that’s how I ended up with a dress with folds. It’s ok, I move a lot in dresses and it won’t notice much. But in a next dress I will certainly make a cut at the waist and take out some fabric. In the back at the very least.

From the side the extra fabric at the back shows very well:
Untitled
That hem looks good though!

A look at the front curviness from the side. The princess lines take care of that 32G beautifully:
Untitled
With room to breathe. I like breathing. And is that side seam acceptably straight?

I consider those folds the only thing “wrong” with this dress. There’s so much “Right” with this dress! In the back, at the top, the dress clings to my skin beautifully. No gap. Further down it follows the curve of my back. At the front there is no “side boob fabric” gaping. The skirt flares inward a bit below the hip, creating a flattering shape for my body type. The hem is fairly straight. All the things I wrote about in previous dresses are not problems here.
Yes, very pleased.

Another more twisted thing I noticed: I carry my right shoulder in front of my hip. My left is at the side. I twist my upper body to the left. You can see on pictures that my one hand is more turned inward than the other. Had I be wearing rings today you would have seen one on one hand but not on the other. Because again, I am standing straight:
Untitled

I’ll leave it for now I guess. If I learn to adjust my posture permanently I might have to make new slopers…

(still, I guess I better learn to get a better posture before I grow old and crooked and set in my ways. But for the time being I want to wear my handmade, adjusting for crookedness, dresses. They already make me sit up straight and breathe better. The twisted posture thing I’ll tackle when I enter the final third of my life, at age 80.)
(what? I’m growing to be a 120 years, don’t you?)

study: a gala dress my mum made

as I still await the arrival of the two patterns I studie clothes I own. I have one handmade dress, my mum made it for me exactly 20 years ago. (ok, 19 years and 50 weeks ago)

It still fits!
UntitledUntitledUntitled

It has prinsess lines, flaring skirt. It is made of silk (real silk, very flowing) and lined with synthetic shiny fabric, alsof very light and flowing)

You see some characteristics my body has: broad shoulders but not a big frame. A big bust (in relation to that frame) and neither a small waist nor big hips. I am a goblet. Or a reverted triangle.

V shaped necklines, 3/4 sleeves and garments that hug the hips and flare out at knee length look good on me. A wriggle dress will look smashing, as long as it suggests a waist rather than enforces it. (girl likes to breath)

There are a few issues with fit with this dress. The neck line gapes…
Untitled

and so does the side bust.

UntitledUntitled

It could do with a tuck but I do not yet know how to do this. I have read up on altering horizontal and vertical bust darts but with princess lines I take it the lines have to be unpicked. This dress is fully lined so that would mean unpicking the whole dress. Also, I may not want to because of sentimental value.

The gaping in the back might have been less 20 years ago, I am 41 now and my posture may have changed.

I love looking at the details. I start to see more and more things, the more I read about sewing.

Untitled
The princess line in the back runs all the way up to the shoulder seam.(but it isn’t centered)
The lining in the armhole is attached to the silk with minute little hand stitches.The lining doesn’t run to the very edge of the arm hole, it stops just short and it doesn’t peak out.

Untitled
there’s a zipper that is hidden, the silk has little overlaps to hide it.
A row of vertical little hand stitches runs next to the zipper, on both sides.

Untitled
I don’t know why those stitches are there. Perhaps to keep the silk lay flat over the zipper? No flaring upwards? I take it on the inside it keeps the pieces neat.
Untitled
from the inside it now shows me that the little stitches keep the lining nicely in place against the outer fabric. And out of the way when working that zipper, you wouldn’t want it to be caught in the zipper teeth.

Also in this picture you can see how the front neck was done. The lining and silk were sewed right in the ditch with the right sides facing. The piece was turned right side out and the seam was pressed.
I can see that the result is not as tidy as it was in the armhole, here the lining is visible from the outside. I do not know yet if this has to do with pressing, with bulk of the seam allowance in that part or with the used technique. I have read about other techniques but they take more time. This is a “good enough” fast technique.

It is fun to see some of my mothers thinking in this dress. She must have ran out of time or out of fun or it had to be finished sóón. She whipped open her bag of sewing skills and chose whatever got the job done.

This is what I love in all handmades, to see something personal of the creator come through. This is also why I do not care for perfect projects. (I aim for near perfection. Showing you my only sewing experiences in all their frumpiness (the skirt and the shirt) really put a dent in my self image.)

next: reinforcements
Untitled
The front of the neck is reinforced with white fusible ….eh… interfacing! that’s it!

  • interfacing reinforces parts of a pattern piece that need it. (front neck line, arm hole)
  • underlining reinforces a whole pattern piece. Basically you sew two pieces of cloth together and treat them as one. Good for shear fabrics (white linen, chiffon, organza) or very light fabrics (chiffon, silk).
  • interlining is the same as underlining but has the purpose of adding an extra layer for warmth.
  • lining is an extra layer between the outer fabric and the body. It serves ease of putting on and ease of wearing. It reduces sweat getting to the outer fabric (handy for linen as it will wrinkle when confronted with body moisture) or for warmth. Or for the sheer fun of it (” Care for a bright bold pattern inside your very mature jacket, sir?”). Lining hides the seams (and protects them somewhat I think).
  • a slip is a separated piece of undergarment, a little dress, to be worn under a dress. It has the same functions as lining.

In my dress the interfacing is fused to the lining. Very clever as it would have shown up miserably were it to be fused to the silk outer fabric.

The ‘ragged’ seam you see in the right side of the white interface is where the seam is that is pressed and that shows a little bit on the outside in the picture above this one. It has little cuts in it to allow it to follow the curve. Perhaps if it was trimmed smaller, the excess fabric cut away, it would have been pressed more out of sight.

But this would probably demand more measures to prevent that seam from fraying. No wait, fused interface won’t fray and neither will the lining it is fused to. It may be more difficult to press in its proper shape, a seam with a short seam allowance. This then would benefit from a small row of stitches that keeps it into place. But those stitches would be visible from the outside, as they would be through the silk, and that is not desirable on this dress.

UntitledUntitled

Inside I found three different kind of seams. One was pressed open, one was pressed to the side and one was pressed open and its sides handsewed. To prevent fraying I think. It also has little cuts, to allow for movement (?). I’ve seen this kind of seams online on a couture dress:

Marina von Koenig explains in a wonderful article over at Burdastyle.com

Here are two curves sewn together and the round cuts are for allowing that shape. The article also adresses working with linen and using both an interlining and a lining to get excellent results.

This is the kind of level I want to be at, intellectually. These are the sort of things I want to know, want to be able to do. Marina von Koenig has some wonderful reviews of dresses she made online.

Sparring partner in this yellow white dress was Susan Khalje who really knows a lot!

Years ago she wrote a wonderful book about using linen and cotton. It focuses on the fabric, not on patterns. It is no longer in print but it’s one I’d love to have. I’m thinking about buying the ebook even though I prefer paper books….

if only I lived in the USA…I’d take her class!

UPDATE: I purchased the ebook Linen and Cotton  by Susan Khalje with the publisher of Threadsmagazine. It was on sale and only cost $12,79.